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Hagar and Ishmael in Biblical Allegory

In the previous article, that part of Galatians 4 containing the allegory referring to Hagar was quoted. First, you read there in verses 22 and 23 that “Abraham had two sons, one by the handmaid and one by the freewoman. Howbeit, the son by the handmaid has been born after the flesh; but the son […]

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Ishmael Blessed and in the Covenant (IV)

“As for Ishmael, I have heard thee; behold, I have blessed him!” (Gen. 17:20). These words are uttered in God’s answer to Abraham’s prayer. Ishmael, by many, not by all, commentators is regarded as a reprobate. With them we disagree. Nor do we believe that the words quoted above mean only that God would in […]

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Hagar and the Promise of a Son (III)

As for Ishmael, I have heard thee: behold, I have blessed him, and will make him fruitful, and will multiply him exceedingly…” (Gen. 17:20). We proceed with the question of Hagar and Ishmael on the basis and thesis that when God says “blessed” He means “blessed” and when He says “loved” He means “loved”. This […]

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Hagar and the Angel of the Lord

“As for Ishmael, I have heard thee: Behold, I have blessed him, and will make him fruitful, and will multiply him exceedingly.” (Genesis 17:20). This text, whether one holds that Ishmael is elect or reprobate, cannot validly be used to prove the common grace theory that God has a general goodness out of which He […]

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Genesis 17-21

III. The gift of a son a demonstration of God’s mercy Soon after this, Abraham journeyed to the country of the Philistines near Gerar after having spent some time in the land between Kadesh and Shur. Gerar was in the land of Canaan to the south and west and was ruled by a man whose […]

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Genesis 15-16

God Promises Abram a Son 1. The Occasion a. “After these things” (1) The connection between this chapter and the preceding chapter is indicated by this statement. (2) The question here then is; After what things did this vision come to Abram? (a) The most natural antecedent of these things is that which is recorded […]

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