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Jan Hus—Today You Cook a Goose!

The most dangerous man to the Roman Catholic Church stood alone. It was the morning of July 6, 1415. Everyone who was anyone—the highest ranking Catholic clergy and even Emperor Sigismund himself—gathered in the towering German cathedral, the site of the Council of Constance. Their goal was finally to rid the Catholic church of the […]

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True and Complete Doctrine of Salvation

For most readers, the title of this editorial probably rings a bell. If it sounds familiar to you, that’s because it is a prominent phrase in one of the documents that most Protestant Reformed churches read on a regular basis. That document is the form for public confession of faith, which lists three questions that […]

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God’s Preparation for the Reformation

The Great Reformation of the sixteenth century is a lesson in God’s providence. This is certainly true of all history when seen through the eyes of faith, but it becomes especially clear when we consider the striking renewal of the church that God worked through men like Martin Luther, Ulrich Zwingli, and John Calvin. Most […]

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Gottschalk of Orbais and Double Predestination

By the early 800s, the Roman Catholic Church had become a corrupted institution and was constantly moving further from God’s word. Corruption among the leaders of the church was already rampant and would continue to worsen in the centuries following. Most significantly, the doctrine of salvation was false. Although it was not yet the church’s […]

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Jacques LeFèvre

Many scholars consider Jacques LeFèvre (Jacob Faber) a pre-reformer. In fact, he was not, as will become plain.   Who was he? LeFèvre was a Frenchman, born in Etaples, in the province of Picardy, about 1455. So he was in fact born before the Reformation began. Significant is that he was a humanist. Humanists were […]

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